Beauty Everywhere

There is beauty all around us, all the time, often when we least expect it, if we’re paying attention. The Greeks of the classical age spoke of how beauty, the creation and appreciation of which, was a value equal to Truth and Goodness. I’d like to propose another reason to ponder beauty as a value—the appreciation of beauty can be a mindfulness practice—a way of enriching and embedding our moments, heightening our awareness and training our attention: an antidote to the hyper-distractedness of our time. What is essential though is a broader understanding and embrace of what constitutes beauty….as a way of integrating attentive discernment, as a form of meditation in action.

Howard Gardner, a developmental psychologist at Harvard University, proposes three criteria for a new understanding of beauty for modern times. First, the object, or subject is INTERESTING.  And since as they say, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, it simply has to be interesting to you. Second, it’s FORM is memorable…sufficiently powerful or evocative. This raises the bar a bit. …but still is subjective. Lastly, there is a desire to encounter the EXPERIENCE again, due to liking, curiosity or a feeling of awe. Again-suited to your personal taste. What’s missing here for me is some sense of universality–some criteria not based on personal taste or cultural differences. Is it possible to create some standard that we can all aspire to and integrate into our daily experience, as a way of centering ourselves, as a spiritual practice…as a way out of the perpetual visual clutter…as an antidote to all the distracting documentation of our every moment?

It’s about shifting the focus (pun intended). It’s about changing the way we use our devices. It’s about learning how to tune in rather than tune out. It’s about learning how to pay attention in different ways. It’s about learning how to have a ‘Good Eye’. Stay tuned….

elizabeth watt

Elizabeth has been recognized as one of the industry’s top still life and food photographers for over 20 years. She studied photography at the Newhouse School at Syracuse University. With an extensive technical background, Elizabeth draws her inspiration from painting, collage, sculpture and nature.  Her commercial work has a distinctly artistic focus. Her work has appeared in numerous magazines such as Food & Wine, Gourmet, Bon Appetite, Martha Stewart Living, Body and Soul, Town and Country, O Magazine, Fortune Magazine and The New York Times Magazine. Her commercial clients have included Campbell’s, Proctor & Gamble, Colgate Palmolive, Pepperidge Farms, Kraft,  General Mills,  Bath and Bodyworks, American Express, Neiman Marcus and Rosewood Resorts. She has many award winning book covers to her credit, and countless cookbooks, and has been featured in both Graphis and Communication Arts Magazines.

 

Elizabeth also enjoys teaching Photography and Creative Process both in academia and the corporate world. She has been an adjunct professor of photography at the Newhouse School at Syracuse University, and a guest lecturer at The School of Visual Arts and Parsons in NYC, as well as running workshops and seminars at various locations around the country.

 

Elizabeth blogs on the subjects of creativity, seeing, and photography at www.create-shift.com/blog. After completing an executive coaching certificate through NYU's School of Leadership and Human Capital Management, Elizabeth also helps people shift their mindsets and create habits to support creative output. More of this work can be seen at www.create-shift.com.

In addition to photography, Elizabeth is currently working on a book on how to leverage the creative mindset in the service of everyday productivity. She currently lives in San Miguel de Allende